Thursday, March 15

a Poem for Thursday


In The Beginning.





In the beginning
There was
Walter de la Mare,
Robert Louis Stevenson
And
A.A. Milne

Rose Fyleman was there too
With
The Oxford Book of English Verse.

And there was a train
In the beginning,
Made out of chairs
Placed in a row.
And children,
Lots of children
Laughing,
As the words got faster.

In the beginning
Words made sense,
And sensibilities were easy to understand.
And that was in the beginning
When words floated around in the air,
And sometimes
Ended up inside my head.

And it was easy
To join them up
One to one
And twos to threes.
And often they joined up so fast
That they tumbled over one another
In joy.

And that was just the beginning.


When I was merely a five year old, my mother took me to a house down the road towards the city. 
That was the very beginning of my relationship with poetry.
I studied every week with this teacher until I was in my early 20s.
He instilled in me a love of rhyme and rhythm.
And also a deeper understanding of why people write poetry.
He had his favourite poets and playrights and I became part of that love.
Ibsen, Frost,Strindberg, MacNiece,Yeats,Whitman as well as the English Romantics .
What a priviledged experience!

This is linked to dVerse Poetics on dVerse.  

Wednesday, March 14

Inspired by Hockney.

I'm putting up some more pics today from Ashridge Woods in Hertfordshire.
 I went there with my daughter on Thursday to have a walk through the trees,  then  lunch  by a warming fire in a local pub.

The exhibition at the Royal Academy, of Hockney's take on the Yorkshire countryside, opens your eyes to the beauty of  "very littleness"...if there is such an expression!

It's in this way that I feel so much of our landscape is viewed......


...in the soft neutral colours and tones of the palettes as used  by our wonderful British watercolourists...
... such as Constable and Ruskin.
I love going to the Abbott Hall Galleries in Kendal just to gaze in awe at the watercolour room tucked away at the back of the building.

But if I'm honest to my own colour leanings.....I crave colour and expressionistic saturation!
I'm a lover of van Gogh and Matisse and also the northern group of expressionists,  the Blaue Reiter...with Nolde and Kandinsky etc.
In many ways I think this is what Hockney has brought into the art of English landscape, from his living and painting in California .
So the photo above had some colour washed out on the saturation app. on Picnic...and the one underneath, had the colours saturated in the opposite direction.


(The photographer in the pic. by the way... is she of Neviepie Cakes fame!)






I'm sure people have their own opinions about whether or not an artist should take colour "liberties" when painting the landscape.
Maybe you might like to post a comment on your preference.

I'm just posting up some of the other creatures who really don't mind either way!!


 

Just as long as he can rediscover the secret hiding places of the autumn nuts hidden for a hungry day!

Monday, March 12

Ashridge Forest

We were out walking  on Friday...that is, the lovely daughter, she of Neviepie Cakes fame and myself...walking and taking pics in Ashridge Forest , Herts.
Me...I'm sooo inspired having been with her and little sister from over the water...Rosie McClelland... to see the Hockney Show at the Royal Academy, and I'm  full of wonderful ideas for future paintings.
Inspired by the apparant nowhereness of Hockney's landscapes and the amazing effect that they had on me, I'm wanting to take glorious photos of trees and grass, of wild flowers and who knows what else!

Then along comes this sweet face, staring at me through the trunks of the forest.


"Honestly woman, just take what you see....you won't get much better than this".

And off she bound!

(She...he?...I'm not sure actually).